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Author Topic: Breeding Journal, Species: Acreichthys radiatus - Radiated Filefish  (Read 13312 times)
mpedersen
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« on: January 22, 2013, 01:48:03 am »

Breeding Journal DataSheet: Acreichthys radiatus - the Radiated or Radial Filefish
This first post should be updated regularly to include new information as events take place or changes are made to your system

General

Species: Acreichthys radiatus
Social Structure: male/female pair.
Size of Individuals: 2 inches
Age of Individuals: unknown, wild caught.  presumed young (were perhaps only 1" upon arrival
Date added to Tank: June 8th, 2011

Broodstock Tank Details
Size of Tank: 33 x-long
Substrate Details: CaribSea Fiji Pink Live Sand
Filtration Details: Sicce Shark Internal Power Filter
Water Changes: Sporadic lately...generally 30% a shot.
Water Temperature:
Lighting: 48" Current USA True Lumen Pro 8000K daylight LED Strip.
Lighting Cycle: recently shortened from 2 PM to 3 AM schedule to 7 PM to 2 AM schedule.
Other Tank Inhabitants: 1M/1F Banggai Cardinalfish, Pterapogon kauderni.

Broodstock Feeding Details
Food Types: Have grown up on a varied diet of Spectrum Pellets, PE Mysis, Spirulina Enriched Brine Shrimp, Rod's Food, Scallops
Feeding Schedule: as infrequently as 1 time daily, as frequently as 3-4 times daily.  Feeding regime as of late has been twice per day, Frozen foods and grated Scallops soaked in Super Selcon.

Spawning Details
Date of First Spawn: Not 100% sure, but based on observation of female being very fat, and subsequently very skinny, it appears that spawning occurred on January 19th, 2013 (1-19-2013)
Spawn Time of Day: unknown...spawn was not observed
Dates of Consecutive Spawns: N/A
Courtship Details: Did not observe courtship.  Post spawn, pair remains at opposite ends of the tank, the female guarding the nest.
Egg Size: 0.8 mm
Egg Color: clear
Egg Count: not yet counted

Hatch Details
Hatch Date:
Hatch Time of Day:
# Days after Spawn:
Larvae Description:


Larval Tank Details
Temperature:
Size of Larval Tank:
Substrate Details:
Other Tank Decor:
Filtration Details:
Lighting:
Lighting Cycle:
Water Changes:

Larval Feeding Details
Food Types:
Feeding Schedule:

Metamorphosis/Settlement
Date of Settlement Start:
Days after Hatch:
Date of Settlement End:
Description of Fry:

Grow-Out Tank Details
Temperature:
Size of Grow-Out Tank:
Substrate Details:
Other Tank Decor:
Filtration Details:
Lighting:
Lighting Cycle:
Water Changes:
Size at Transfer:
Age at Transfer:

Grow-Out Feeding Details
Food Types:
Feeding Schedule:

Additional Information
Miscellaneous Information:


You will be required to provide photographic evidence in this thread of each event submitted for the MBI Program.
If your thread does not contain these photos the MBI Committee will not be able to approve your reports.
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mpedersen
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« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2013, 04:13:03 am »

A brief bit of back story - this pair was purchased in 2011 to the tune of $200 (that's what it went for when it was introduced!).  The crew at LiveAquaria sexed them based on the dimorphism of the related Bristletail filefish (Acreichthys tomentosus); turns out they were right...male has a very defined patch of transparent bristles on both sides of the caudal peduncle, which is absent in the female.

The pair first lived in a 37 gallon tank if I'm remembering correctly...over the years they've lived with Longnosed Butterflyfish, a breeding pair of Goldstripe Maroons, Yellowtail Blue Damselfish, and probably other fish along the way.  I recently moved them from their 29 gallon aquarium over to one of my Banggai Rescue aquariums, the 33 extra longs.  I don't know the exact date of the move, but it was probably around before the holidays sometime in December, 2012.

The pair has lived together the entire time since their arrival.  Based on the last few days, I am putting spawning as having occurred on Saturday, January 19th, 2013.  I say that, because I recall seeing the female being noticeably thinner, and remember that yesterday, the 20th, she had not put on much weight following a day's worth of feeding.  I didn't make the connection at that point, but I did notice the pair was spending more time apart.  It wasn't until today, the 21st, that I realized what was going on..the female kept sitting on the same corner of the aquarium, and upon closer examination, I saw grains of sand stuck to the side of the aquarium.  Sand doesn't stick to glass unless there's something holding it there...and that's when the light went off.

I remembered Iris Bonig's first spawn of A. tomentosus occurring in sand.  I also remembered the story of triggerfish spawning in the sand, as well as the very first known captive spawning of the Harlequin Filefish, Oxymonacanthus longirostris, as reported in the Breeder's Registry, occurred in sand too.  It seems that for these Filefish species, in the absence of a preferable algae site, they will spawn in the substrate.

Unlike the Harlequin Filefish, these Radiated Filefish may be their own undoing when it comes to finding the eggs, because the female filefish GUARDS THEM.  In reading Iris's old internet postings, it's suggestive that literature reports say the male guards the eggs, but my firsthand experience with this pair shows no doubt, it is the female in my pair.  So even if they spawn in different locations on subsequent attempts, the nest should be relatively easy to locate as the female will be tending it Wink

After taking a sampling of eggs, I confirmed that they are indeed eggs, 0.8 mm or so in diameter according to my QX5 Microscope, and they are 100% fertilized and viable.  I already saw embryo's quivering in the eggs, which suggests that these are not 12 or 24 hours old, but likely 48, maybe more.  A. tomentosus hatches in 2-3 days, and so this species might as well.  It sounds like A. tomentosus hatches at night - we'll see what happens with these guys.  Lights went out downstairs in the fishroom around 2:40 AM tonight...and the main lights on the system won't come back on until about 7 PM.  You can bet I'll be watching.

Based on past experiences, I opted to harvest the nest tonight.  I had planned to scoop out a bunch of sand in order to get the eggs, but that idea turned out completely unneccessary.  The bulk of the eggs were all connected in one big kinda horse-shoe  / volcano-shaped ring, diameter maybe 1.25".  The mass was easily pushed out of the sand with the tip of a pipette, and in turn pushed into a specimen cup that I had submerged.  From there I opted to split the egg mass in half..I may have broken some eggs, but by my estimate there are hundreds, if not 1000+.  No big loss.

I split the mass so I could test two slightly different variations on incubation.  I kept a larger portion in a small, 0.25 gallon specimen cup that was brand new, with tank water.  I took the smaller portion and placed it in a used, 0.5 gallon large specimen container, filled with aged, new, artificial saltwater.  Chances are if either works, both ought to, but you never know.  Both cups are now hanging INSIDE the aquarium for temperature regulation, and the glass lid will help reduce any short-term evaporation that comes.  I also have one very small sample still sitting at room temperature underneath my digital scope - it's in a covered tiny petri dish, so perhaps I'll get some hatching going on under the scope as well.

Photos to come in the future, but it is now VERY late (technically very early - 3 AM on 1-22-2013), and I need to sleep! Wish me luck!
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mpedersen
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« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2013, 04:47:23 am »

Two videos posted on youtube tonight before I hit the sack:

Eggs under the QX5 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UseReAPec5A&feature=youtu.be
Female Tending her Nest - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3VnIv5l7ok0&feature=youtu.be
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« Reply #3 on: January 23, 2013, 04:34:09 am »

1-23-2013 - 3:33 AM - HATCH!!!!!! Happened between 1:00 and 3:30 AM..and many more still to come by the looks of it....most eggs are NOT hatched at this time.
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« Reply #4 on: January 23, 2013, 04:57:35 am »

Prolarvae (almost larvae) measures approximately 2.5 mm according to the QX5 at 60X magnification.
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« Reply #5 on: January 23, 2013, 03:11:38 pm »

1/23/2013 - 2:10 PM - low hatch rate...not much else happened overnight.  Placing most or all into a well established 5.5 gallon tank with a heater and sponge filter.  Going old school for this first run.  Have 1 gallon of clean aged new saltwater in the tank, placed 0.25 gallon specimen cup in the tank to acclimate for temp differences while a drip of new saltwater has been started, it should overflow into the tank freely..slow enough that it won't flush the larvae out however.  Going to release them later on today.

I am guessing that I pulled the eggs a day early, and that given the overall structure of this tangled mass of eggs, maybe only the outside ones hatched, the inner ones dying due to lack of O2?  Perhaps the female's nest tending care plays a vital role in ensuring the egg vaibility?  Just guesses at this point, but I actually had better hatch rates in the smaller cup that had broodstock water vs. the larger cup that was clean aged new saltwater.  HMM.
« Last Edit: January 23, 2013, 03:13:37 pm by mpedersen » Logged

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« Reply #6 on: January 23, 2013, 04:33:05 pm »

Hatch Video posted on Youtube - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q3upQMbLvkY&feature=youtu.be
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blennieluvr
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« Reply #7 on: January 23, 2013, 05:29:29 pm »

I have wanted to comment but wasn't sure if that was appropriate in one of these journals until I realized that Mr. MP can totally get rid of this post if he wanted so, now I can freely comment that,

"This is AWESOME!!!!!!!!!!!!!"


Thanks for the footage too!
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Pumbooris
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« Reply #8 on: January 23, 2013, 09:02:06 pm »

awsome video Matt!!! you are a fish breeding machine.   you must be playing marvin gaye in your fish room when the lights go out.
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« Reply #9 on: January 24, 2013, 12:50:28 am »

How does it go from a .8mm egg to a 2.5mm prolarvae at hatch? Are these figures right?
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« Reply #10 on: January 24, 2013, 11:54:49 am »

They're curled up in the egg Matt...
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« Reply #11 on: January 24, 2013, 11:27:59 pm »

1-24-2013 - 7 PM - Added in SS Strain rotifers form Algagen, plus size sieved a scoop of Pseudodiamptomus copepods, using 120 microns to seive, 10 to collect, and dumped that in as well (hopefully introduced some copepod nauplii).  Added  about 20 drops of RotiGreen Nanno to tint the water green as well.  Already seeing strikes at foods.  Little buggers have tiny black pinprick eyes.
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« Reply #12 on: January 25, 2013, 12:38:49 am »

They're curled up in the egg Matt...
Ok, if the figures were correct that's what I thought must be the case, that was the only thing that makes sense. Sorry, carry on. Wink
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« Reply #13 on: January 28, 2013, 12:06:06 am »

1-27-2013 - yesterday night there weren't many babies left, and very few rotifers so I pulsed in a fresh group.  This morning I saw no larvae swimming.  So first batch appears done.  Not as "easy" as Iris's experiences with A. tomentosus had led me to believe.  These are going to take some work afterall.
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« Reply #14 on: February 07, 2013, 01:23:57 am »

2-6-2013 - sometime...time unknown, they must have put down a nest; I discovered it this evening (it's just after midnight now on 2-7 as I type this).  I have yet to sample the nest to see what stage of development the eggs are in, but I learned my lesson from last time - if I harvest any, I need to try aeration.
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