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Author Topic: Breeding Journal, Species: Chaetodon larvatus (Hooded Butterflyfish)  (Read 27620 times)
mpedersen
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« on: October 08, 2010, 11:33:32 am »

Breeding Journal DataSheet
This first post should be updated regularly to include new information as events take place or changes are made to your system

General

Species: Chaetodon larvatus, Red Sea Hooded or Red/Orange Face Butterflyfish.  
Social Structure: Attempting to Pair
Size of Individuals: maybe 1.75" and 2 to 2.25" Standard length
Age of Individuals: unknown, wild caught
Date added to Tank: 10-8-2010

Broodstock Tank Details
Size of Tank: 24 gallon Nanocube initially
Substrate Details: live sand
Filtration Details: Stock Nanocube Filtration, carbon etc
Water Changes: at least 25% weekly
Water Temperature: around 80F
Lighting: Stock nanocube 50/50 Power Compact fluorescent lighting.
Lighting Cycle: roughly 10 to 10:30?
Other Tank Inhabitants: 1 Pair of Serranus annularis, 1 pair of Amphiprion percula "Onyx", and 1 Labriodes dimidiatus

Broodstock Feeding Details
Food Types:
Feeding Schedule:

Spawning Details
Date of First Spawn:
Spawn Time of Day:
Dates of Consecutive Spawns:
Courtship Details:
Egg Size:
Egg Color:
Egg Count:

Hatch Details
Hatch Date:
Hatch Time of Day:
# Days after Spawn:
Larvae Description:


Larval Tank Details
Temperature:
Size of Larval Tank:
Substrate Details:
Other Tank Decor:
Filtration Details:
Lighting:
Lighting Cycle:
Water Changes:

Larval Feeding Details
Food Types:
Feeding Schedule:

Metamorphosis/Settlement
Date of Settlement Start:
Days after Hatch:
Date of Settlement End:
Description of Fry:

Grow-Out Tank Details
Temperature:
Size of Grow-Out Tank:
Substrate Details:
Other Tank Decor:
Filtration Details:
Lighting:
Lighting Cycle:
Water Changes:
Size at Transfer:
Age at Transfer:

Grow-Out Feeding Details
Food Types:
Feeding Schedule:

Additional Information
Miscellaneous Information:

Generally considered doomed although both vendors place this in the "moderate" category.  Honestly, these are right up there with Harlequin Filefish based on my research.  I realize the chances of survival are low, but they are in a full blown reef with lots of Majano anemones, and can nip at anything they like in there.  There is hope possibly.  If I get one to live for a year, I will be ecstatic!  If I get both to survive and one day spawn, it will be a major coup.  Rear them?  Would be the history books.

http://www.fishbase.org/summary/speciessummary.php?id=12287
http://www.bluezooaquatics.com/productDetail.asp?cid=26&pid=582&did=1
http://www.reefhotspot.com/store/product_info.php?cPath=21_29&products_id=629
« Last Edit: October 09, 2010, 01:42:34 am by mpedersen » Logged

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mpedersen
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« Reply #1 on: October 09, 2010, 01:56:32 am »

They came in and were first temperature acclimated (floating).  Then the bags were emptied into a 5 gallon bucket, and a bit of CloramX was added (to neutralize any ammonia that built up, so that as pH rose, the ammonia didn't become more toxic and create a problem).  They were dripped to a full 5 gallons, at which point 1 gallon of the acclimation water (mostly pure tank water) was pulled aside.  This gallon was mixed with 20 drops of Formalin in a second bucket, and aerated.  The two fish were then given a 10 minute bath in Formalin, after which they were returned to the acclimation bucket to "rinse off".  After a few minutes of rinsing, the fish were added to the broodstock tank, where fresh new carbon was added just on the odd chance that any formalin got into the reef.  Here's a look at the destination tank, as it sat, the night before the Butterflies arrived:








So here's your first look - shot these during the drip acclimation.



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« Reply #2 on: October 11, 2010, 11:42:00 am »

So, I'm starting to think "this may actually WORK"! 
 
The pair is getting along pretty well - at first, I thought they weren't going to work out but it seems they've figured things out (the smaller one is actually, possibly, more dominant?).  This morning, I watched as they nailed brown palys (the junky Caribbean ones - came in as a "freebie" and took over the tank), a blue polyp Cap frag (maybe 3" X 2"...I have more if they destroy it) and even saw the small one nip a Majano.  Both are picking, and picking frequently.  It would appear that all my palys are retracting their tentacles now.  I may pick up an acro colony today, just to further help them along and buy them time until they sample something not live Wink
 
I thought it's worth mentioning that I've hit their tank with Maracyn (Erythromycin + B vitamins) on Saturday and Sunday night (and will continue to do so for a full 5 day course).  I did this as a prophalactic as I know it to be safe in a reef, but also, because it contains high levels of B Vitamins specifically to increase appetite.  I have some adult brine growing up in all my dottyback baby tanks - I tried offering it yesterday but got no reaction.  will keep trying.
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« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2010, 12:53:19 am »

10-12-2010 - 12:50 AM

So this evening I threw the gamut of food at them again.  I've seen them pick on the palys, the majano anemones, the yellow leather coral, and a couple frags of green w/blue polyp monti cap I threw in.  The biggest news for me is that I witnessed the larger one eat a single live adult brine shrimp, as well as several little pieces of grated frozen squid.  I'll be doing a lot of squid feeding this week I bet!

Here's some images I shot on the morning of 10-11-2010:







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« Reply #4 on: November 22, 2010, 02:09:49 pm »

11-22-2010

Today, one of the larvatus died.  I haven't been keeping this thread updated like I should.  A few weeks back, the tank containing the larvatus and other fish broke out with Ich (Cryptocaryon).  The first to get it were actually the Onyx Perculas.  Despite good care, they did not shrug it.  It spread to the Butterflies.  I instituted Formalin dips, and later on Formalin + FW dips, to no benefit.  Even tossed a 25 watt UV sterilizer on a 24 gallon tank and that didn't seem to stem the ever increasing tide of Ich, which was now also afflicting the Serranus annularis in the tank.

On 11-10-2010, I made the decision to remove ALL the fish from the tank and place them in a hospital environment.  In the end, the 7 fish went into a 29 gallon tank where I treated with Cupramine.  It took 4-5 days for the Ich to disappate, during which time none of the fish showed much interest in food.  When I left town last Wednesday for work, the 17th, the larger Larvatus was clearly hard hit from the Ich and was barely feeding.  I made the decision, a gamble, to move it back into the 24 gallon tank, which had been empty and running with the UV, since the 10th.  The fish seemed to perk up and quickly set out nipping on the Majanos.  My instructions to Renee were to continue feeding in minced squid, which had been one of the foods this larger fish would take in the past.

Returning home 20th, I did not see it feeding, nor have I seen it feed over the next 48 hours.  Around noon, I found it stuck to the overflow, not breathing, yet still slightly alive.  I put it out of its misery.

The sad truth here is that this larger fish was the one that settled in faster and was doing better PRIOR to the outbreak of Ich.  Now, the smaller one is well filled out, Lymphocystis gone, and looking as if it may live a long life in captivity if all things go well.  Were it not for the ICH, and perhaps my reluctance to immediately treat the fish with Cupramine in QT, I believe the larger fish would've still been around and doing fine.
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